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Ecrit le : Jeudi 19 Juillet 2012 23h31
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Hollywood is Adapting to and Merging with Chinese and International Movie Markets
2012-07-05 17:22:38 Chinese Films

The Cinema of China is one of three distinct historical threads of Chinese-language cinema together with the Cinema of Hong Kong and the Cinema of Taiwan. China has restrictions on foreign movies and the content of movies. Currently, the vast majority of the Mainland-produced movies use Mandarin. Mainland films are often dubbed into Cantonese when exported to Hong Kong for theatrical runs.

As of 2010 Chinese cinema is the third largest film industry by number of feature films produced annually. In 2011 Chinese films earned 54% of a total box office of US$2.06 billion. China's box-office receipts grew 33.3 percent in 2011 and by the first quarter of 2012, it has surpassed Japan in box-office receipts by becoming the second-largest in the world.

More Big Movies and the largest movie market around 2018

Hollywood will adapt to and merge with the Chinese movie market and other international markets.

Price Waterhouse Coopers has released its 2012 annual Global Media Outlook. It's a 5-year forecast analyzing the future of 13 industries internationally. According to the Outlook, film entertainment revenue is expected to rise more than 14-billion dollars in the next five years.

The study found shows that in 2011 North American box office spending fell nearly 4 percent. Ticket sales here dipped to their lowest levels since the mid-1990's.

He said, "Why the Hollywood, North-American market is slowing down. I think it's pretty much saturated at this point. It's reached a kind of plateau."

The study projects Asian movie revenues will increase by 5 billion dollars the next 5 years-led primarily by gains in China. China will even surpass North America to become the largest and most lucrative film market in the world.

James Cameron has been in discussions for coproductions in China. Avatar and Titanic were very successful in China and it appears that China is on track to become the largest movie market. A deal made February, 2012 has paved the way for the import of 14 premium format films, such as IMAX or 3-D, which will be exempt from China's annual quota of 20 foreign films per year. Chinese film makers having been working to pay Cameron for his expertise in making successful 3D big budget movies. Those coproductions will be considered domestic movies but will use 3D and big budget movie effects.

Commercial Successes of Domestic Chinese Films

Feng Xiaogang's The Dream Factory (1997) was one of the first to bridge the gap between critical acclaim and successful commercialism. The Dream Factory was heralded as a turning point in Chinese movie industry, a hesui pian (Chinese New Year-screened film) which demonstrated the viability of the commercial model in China's socialist market society. Feng has become the most successful commercial director in the post-1997 era. All of his films made high returns domestically while he used ethnic Chinese co-stars like Rosamund Kwan, Jacqueline Wu, Rene Liu and Shu Qi to boost his films' appeal.

Today, owing to the influx of Hollywood films (though the number screened each year is curtailed), Chinese domestic cinema faces mounting challenges. Though the industry is growing, few domestic films save those by Feng make the box office impact of major Hollywood blockbusters like Titanic (1997). In January 2010 James Cameron's Avatar was pulled out from non-3D theaters for Hu Mei's biopic Confucius, but this move led to a backlash on Hu's film. Zhang Yang's 2005 Sunflower also made little money, but his earlier, low-budget Spicy Love Soup (1997) grossed ten times its budget of ¥3 million. Likewise, the 2006 Crazy Stone, a sleeper hit, was made for just 3 million HKD/US$400,000. In 2009-11, Feng's Aftershock (2009) and Jiang Wen's Let the Bullets Fly (2010) became China's highest grossing domestic films, with Aftershock earning RMB 640 million (US$97.4 million) and Let the Bullets Fly RMB 730 million (US$111 million).

Other directors

Chinese cinema's successes beyond 1980 has led to the classifications of "The Fifth Generation" and "Sixth Generation", but some major directors have not been categorized into either, owing to the rather specialized genres they work under. He Ping is a director of mostly Western-like films set in Chinese locale. His Swordsmen in Double Flag Town (1991) and Sun Valley (1995) explore narratives set in the sparse terrain of West China near the Gobi Desert. His historical drama Red Firecracker, Green Firecracker (1994) won a myriad of prizes home and abroad.

Recent cinema has seen Chinese cinematographers direct some acclaimed films. Other than Zhang Yimou, Lü Yue made Mr. Zhao (1998), a black comedy film well received abroad. Gu Changwei's minimalist epic Peacock (2005), about a quiet, ordinary Chinese family with three very different siblings in the post-Cultural Revolution era, took home the Silver Bear prize for 2005 Berlin International Film Festival. Hou Yong is another cinematographer who made films (Jasmine Women, 2004) and TV series. There are actors who straddle the dual roles of acting and directing. Xu Jinglei, a popular Chinese actress, has made four movies to date. Her second film Letter from an Unknown Woman (2004) landed her the San Sebastián International Film Festival Best Director award. The most highly regarded Chinese actor-director is undoubtedly Jiang Wen, who has directed several critically acclaimed movies while following on his acting career. His directorial debut, In the Heat of the Sun (1994) was the first PRC film to win Best Picture at the Golden Horse Film Awards held in Taiwan. His other films, like Devils on the Doorstep (2000, Cannes Grand Prix) and Let the Bullets Fly (2010), were similarly well received. By the early 2011, Let the Bullets Fly has become the highest grossing domestic film in China's history

International Successes

International appeal mounted after the immense international success of Ang Lee's period wuxia film Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon in 2000, which earned Ang and Chinese cinema massive commercial and critical acclaim abroad. Other films such as Farewell My Concubine, 2046, Suzhou River, The Road Home and House of Flying Daggers have also been critically acclaimed around the world.

Chinese bought AMC and is the largest movie theater chain

In May, 2012 China's Dalian Wanda Group and AMC Entertainment made a $2.6 billion deal to take over the U.S. theater group, forming the world's largest cinema chain. Wanda, a private company that previously operated solely in China, generates $16.7 billion in annual revenue from its commercial development and entertainment businesses, the company said. The group owns 86 theaters with 730 screens in China.

In April, The Walt Disney Company China, Marvel Studios and DMG Entertainment of Beijing announced a production deal in which "Iron Man 3" will be co-produced in China. That follows the February announced that a $330 million joint venture between DreamWorks Animation, China Media Capital (CMC) and two other Chinese companies to establish a China-focused family entertainment company, Oriental DreamWorks.

In April, 2012 came revelations, first reported by Reuters, that the Securities and Exchange Commission sent inquiries to 20th Century Fox, Disney and DreamWorks about whether Hollywood studios were paying bribes to get a foothold in the China theater market.

Big budgets for TV as well

Three Kingdoms is a Chinese television series based on events in the late Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms period of Chinese history. The plot is based on Luo Guanzhong's classical novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms, the historical text Records of the Three Kingdoms, and other related stories. Directed by Gao Xixi, the series had a budget of over 180 million yuan (US$30 million)[citation needed] and was released in May 2010. The series was well received both domestically and internationally, earning an estimated 800 million yuan (US$133.3 million) in total as of May 2012.

Source: Next Big Future
source
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Ecrit le : Vendredi 20 Juillet 2012 15h29
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A Crushing Defeat for Chinese Films [Roast Pork Sliced From A Rusty Cleaver] (飲水思源)
Posted by dleedlee at 9:30 PM


A hot Chinese film, "Painted Skin 2", has a box office intake at 300 million yuan (approx. US$47million) within only four days, which encouraged China's film industry. However, a fact can't be neglected is that domestic films have experienced a crushing defeat in the first half of 2012... (ChinaOrg)


Top ten Chinese films suffering the most losses (name/cost/box office)

1, The Viral Factor / 200 milliion yuan (approx US $ 31million )/131 million yuan(approx US $20 million)

2, All's Well Ends Well /75 million yuan/80 million yuan

3, An Inaccurate Memoir /20 milliion yuan /26 million yuan

4, Scheme with Me/nearly 30 million/23 million yuan

5, Shadows of Love/ tens of millions yuan/18 million yuan

6, Fairy Tale Killer/ tens of million yuan/17 million yuan

7, Warriors of the Rainbow: Seedio Bale/ 160 million yuan/14.75 million yuan

8, Inseparable /42 million yuan/9million yuan

9, Joyful Reunion /10 million yuan/4.7 million yuan

10, 11 Flowers/ nearly 10 million yuan/ 4.7million yuan

Note: In China, 1 yuan(US$0.15) investment need a 2.5 yuan(US$0.3)box office revenue to reach a break-even.

Top Ten Chinese films made profits (name/cost/box office)

1, Painted Skin 2/ 120 million yuan/300 million yuan

2, Mission Incredible: Adventures On The Dragon's Trail/12 million yuan/164 million yuan

3, Guns and Roses/ 50 million yuan/154 million yuan

4, I Do / 30 milliion yuan/83 million yuan

5, You Are the Apple of My Eye/nearly 10 million yuan/78 million yuan

6, Love in the Buff/20 million yuan/73 million yuan

7, A Simple Life (Sister Peach)/12 million yuan/71 million yuan

8, The Monkey King 3D/10 million yuan/50 million yuan

9, Blood Stained Shoes/6.5 million yuan/45 million yuan

10, Bixian Panic/ several millions yuan/24 million yuan

CF Hong Kong Box Office Soars by 19% in First Half of 2012

Hong Kong Top Ten Box Office (Jan 1 – June 30)

Title (Release date) US$ (HK$)

1.The Avengers (26/04/2012) $12.45m (HK$96.58m)

2.Men In Black 3 (24/05/2012) $5.69m (HK$44.11m)

3.Journey 2: Mysterious Island (19/01/2012) $4.54m (HK$35.22m)

4.Love In The Buff (29/03/2012) $3.61m (HK$27.97m)

5.A Simple Life (09/03/2012) $3.58m (HK$27.78m)

6.Prometheus (07/06/2012) $3.40m (HK$26.34m)

7.Viral Factor (21/01/2012) $2.86m (HK$22.21m)

8.The Hunger Games (22/03/2012) $2.63m (HK$20.39m)

9.Battleship (12/04/2012) $2.49m (HK$19.32m)

10.I Love Hong Kong 2012 (20/01/2012) $2.47m (HK$19.13m)

CF: China Box Office up 37% in First Half of 2012


China Top Ten Box Office (Jan 1-June 30, 2012)

1.Titanic 3D – $153.46m (RMB976m)

2.Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol – $106.7m (RMB678.9m)

3.The Avengers – $90.41m (RMB575m)

4.Men In Black 3 – $88.05m (RMB560m)*

5.Journey 2: The Mysterious Island – $60.85m (RMB387.33m)

6.Battleship – $50m (RMB318m)

7.John Carter – $40.8m (RMB259.5m)

8.Sherlock Holms: A Game Of Shadows – $29.31m (RMB186.43m)

9.The Great Magician – $27.32m (RMB173.77m)

10.Mission Incredible: Adventures On The Dragon's Trail – $25.9m (RMB164.73m)
source9 juillet 2012
établi depuis China.org
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Ecrit le : Vendredi 27 Juillet 2012 02h55
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Article de inaglobal
Sommaire :
- Entente entre Chine et Hollywood
- La remise en cause de la diversité culturelle
- La force incontournable de la machine hollywoodienne
- RÉFÉRENCES
La Chine s’ouvre à Hollywood au détriment de la diversité culturelle
extrait Parmi l’ensemble des mesures financières et règlementaires en matière d’industries culturelles, une d’entre elles entraîne constamment l’hostilité des administrations des États-Unis et des majors de Hollywood : l’application de quotas de programmation aux fournisseurs de services culturels.
Les États-Unis prétendent que « les quotas transgressent la « main invisible » du marché. Ils leur reprochent leur caractère arbitraire, intrinsèquement injuste et contraire à la valeur primordiale de l’efficacité »[+]. Ainsi, favorisant les produits de divertissement nationaux, les règlementations strictes des autorités chinoises dans le domaine cinématographique limitent extrêmement la fluidité des échanges de produits et de composants et, par conséquent, elles interdisent une stratégie de production, de marketing et distribution intégrés.
Soutenues fortement par la MPAA, les administrations des États-Unis considèrent les produits culturels comme des produits de divertissement (entertainment) semblables, d’un point de vue commercial, aux autres produits et donc entièrement soumis aux règles du commerce international.
.../...
Suite à une plainte des États-Unis en 2007 qui a mis en cause les réglementations posées par la Chine pour les exportateurs et les distributeurs américains de nombreux produits audiovisuels, jugées « discriminatoires », l’OMC a condamné en août 2009 la Chine pour ses pratiques commerciales jugées illicites dans le domaine culturel – cinéma, livres, musique et incompatibles avec les engagements internationaux de la Chine vis-à-vis du cadre normatif de l’OMC[+]. Par conséquent, la Chine s’efforce d’assouplir son système de quotas, en permettant à des films non nationaux d’accéder au marché cinématographique chinois[+]. De ce fait, mi-février 2012, le vice-président américain, Joe Biden, a annoncé que la Chine visait à autoriser quatorze films hollywoodiens supplémentaires dans son marché cinématographique (de préférence pour les formats 3D et Imax) et à augmenter la part des recettes reversée aux distributeurs étrangers, de 13 % à 25 %[+].
De plus, dans le cadre d’une rencontre du vice-président chinois avec Christophe Dodd, ex-sénateur démocrate du Connecticut et président de la MPAA, et Jeffrey Katzenberg, le dirigeant de DreamWorks Animation, a été annoncée la construction d’un studio d’animation à Shanghai, dénommé Oriental DreamWorks. Le studio de Shanghai se dotera d’un investissement initial de 330 millions de dollars en partenariat avec les sociétés chinoises China Media Capital, Shanghai Media Group et Shanghai Alliance Investment, majoritaires avec 55 % du capital. Ainsi, produire localement des films permettra à DreamWorks de passer outre les quotas cinématographiques des autorités chinoises.
D’ailleurs, les relations entre la Chine et Hollywood sont de plus en plus étroites et l’évolution de leur partenariat semble être significative pour le développement futur des industries cinématographiques américaine et chinoise. De ce fait, la société chinoise Wanda, spécialisée notamment dans l’immobilier, s’est transformée le 21 mai 2012 en premier propriétaire mondial de cinémas à la suite de l’acquisition du spécialiste des multiplexes aux États-Unis AMC (American Multi-Cinema). Ce dernier gère un réseau de 346 multiplexes en Amérique du Nord (États-Unis et Canada) qui totalise plus de 5 000 écrans, dont 2 336 écrans 3D et 128 dômes IMAX. De son côté, Wanda, qui enregistre un chiffre d’affaires annuel de 16,7 milliards de dollars et possède 86 cinémas avec 730 écrans, hôtels de luxe et commerces en Chine, a assuré qu’il serait désormais un acteur mondial d’exploitation cinématographique grâce à cette transaction de 2,6 milliards de dollars.

En 2011, malgré le quota limité à 20, les films étrangers, et notamment hollywoodiens, ont accaparé 40 % du box-office chinois. Enfin, ajoutons que le marché cinématographique chinois enregistre une croissance considérable de 35 % en 2011 et devient le troisième plus grand marché cinématographique dans le monde entier[+] avec des recettes globales qui se montent à 2 milliards $. Malgré le quota limité à 20, les films étrangers, et notamment hollywoodiens, ont accaparé 40 % du box-office chinois. Grâce au dynamisme du marché chinois, les recettes du marché cinématographique dans la région Asie-Pacifique ont augmenté de 38 % depuis 2007 et atteignent 9 milliards $ en 2011 contre 6,5 milliards en 2007, illustrant l’importance majeure du marché pour les majors de Hollywood[+].

La remise en cause de la diversité culturelle

La CDEC demeure le fruit de concessions politiques sur des questions controversées et possède un faible degré de contrainte et d’obligation. Issue de négociations internationales âpres, la CDEC demeure le fruit de concessions politiques sur des questions controversées et possède un faible degré de contrainte et d’obligation. Les parties conservent alors une marge de manœuvre considérable dans la mise en application de la CDEC et se montrent en réalité réticentes à l’idée d’avoir les mains liées de manière trop rigide sur des questions sensibles, comme les liens de la CDEC avec les accords commerciaux et le type de politique culturelle appropriée en vue de protéger et de promouvoir la diversité culturelle.

D’un côté, bien que les relations de la CDEC avec les autres instruments n’aient fait l’objet que de deux articles[+], c’est sans aucun doute ceux qui ont suscité le plus de débats lors des négociations. Alors que certains États comme la France, le Canada et la Chine souhaitaient renforcer le statut juridique de la CDEC, en la plaçant sur un pied d’égalité avec des accords commerciaux, d’autres, comme les États-Unis, le Japon et la Nouvelle-Zélande, exigeaient que celle-ci leur soit subordonnée dans la hiérarchie du droit international.
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Les films de Luc Besson et EuropaCorp seront distribués en Chine

Luc Besson va devenir incontournable en Chine. Sa maison de production, EuropaCorp, a signé un contrat exclusif avec le distributeur chinois, Fundamentals Films. Une vitrine non négligeable pour le réalisateur et producteur français.

En tout pas moins de quinze films, produits ou réalisés par Luc Besson, seront assurés d'être vus en Chine. Un partenariat conséquent justifié par le succès de certains films du réalisateur qui ont attiré les foules dans les salles chinoises.
.../...
En attendant, si Luc Besson parvient à passer outre la censure, le premier film à profiter de cette visibilité inédite sera Malavita. A l'affiche de ce thriller, on retrouvera Robert de Niro, Michelle Pfeiffer, Tomme Lee Jones et Diana Agron.

source 23 juillet 2012
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merci bcp
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Merci toanphung smile.gif

Où sont passés les méchants chinois ?
12.07.2012 | Steven Zeitchick, Jonathan Landreth | Los Angeles Times

Désireux de séduire leur plus grand marché à l’exportation et de ne pas déplaire à la censure de Pékin, les grands studios américains veillent à donner une image positive de la Chine.
Lorsque, dans le film d’action Battleship des studios Universal, la Terre est assiégée par des extraterrestres, Washington attribue aux autorités de Hong Kong le mérite d’avoir découvert que les envahisseurs venaient d’une autre planète. Dans la récente comédie romantique Des saumons dans le désert, relatant la construction d’un barrage au Yémen, des ingénieurs chinois – personnages qui n’existent pas dans le roman dont est tiré ce long-métrage – font montre de leur savoir-faire. Dans le film cata­strophe 2012, le secrétaire général de la Maison-Blanche chante les louanges de la Chine et qualifie ses scientifiques de visionnaires pour avoir fabriqué l’arche qui permet de sauver la civilisation.
Dernièrement, les références des productions hollywoodiennes à l’empire du Milieu se multiplient. Certaines relèvent de la flatterie ou sont des ajouts gratuits destinés à satisfaire des partenaires commerciaux et à courtiser le public du premier marché à l’exportation. D’autres, selon certains réalisateurs, ne font que refléter l’essor de la Chine en tant que puissance politique, économique et culturelle.
Quant aux personnages de méchants incarnés par des Chinois, ils ont tout bonnement disparu. Les grands studios ont de plus en plus tendance à éliminer toute référence à la Chine pouvant être perçue comme négative, dans l’espoir d’obtenir le visa de la censure chinoise et de se faire un créneau sur un marché où les productions étrangères sont contingentées.
.../...
“C’est clair et net : c’est peut-être la première fois dans l’histoire de Hollywood que la censure d’un pays étranger a une incidence profonde sur ce que nous produisons”, confie un producteur de premier plan qui, à l’instar de plusieurs confrères interviewés pour cet article, s’est exprimé sous couvert d’anonymat de crainte de froisser d’éventuels partenaires chinois.
Davantage tributaires des recettes réalisées à l’étranger, les studios sont devenus plus attentifs aux sensibilités locales. Ils veillent ainsi depuis un certain temps à ne pas froisser le public japonais, qui était encore récemment leur premier marché à l’exportation. Avec la Chine, les accords de cofinancement ajoutent encore à la pression : les films étrangers coproduits par des sociétés chinoises ne sont pas soumis aux quotas imposés par les autorités de Pékin, mais à condition de comporter des éléments chinois – et, de surcroît, positifs.
.../...
Les effets sont plus problématiques pour le reste du monde. Stanley Rosen redoute que cela ne donne à toute une génération de spectateurs une vision biaisée et aseptisée de la Chine, où la question des droits de l’homme et la dure réalité quotidienne auront été entièrement évacuées.
.../...
Quand bien même un studio serait prêt à prendre en compte les intérêts chinois, ce n’est pas toujours simple pour lui. La société de production américaine Relativity Media pensait avoir fait une bonne opération en acceptant un cofinancement chinois pour son film 21 and Over, une comédie étudiante sans aucun rapport avec l’Asie. Une fois le tournage aux Etats-Unis achevé, le studio a ajouté une trame secondaire avec un personnage sino-américain et le tournage s’est poursuivi en Chine. La production comptait ainsi obtenir des financements supplémentaires et, avec un peu de chance, une sortie sur les écrans chinois.

Relativity Media s’est toutefois rapidement heurtée aux associations de défense des droits de l’homme quand elle a décidé de tourner dans la ville de Linyi, non loin du lieu où le dissident aveugle Chen Guangcheng était assigné à résidence.../...

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suite aux mentions faites dans les articles précédents à Dreamworks orientale :

La dépêche AFP du 17 février 2012 (où l'on voit qu'il ne s'agit pas seulement de faire des animations)

Etats-Unis: DreamWorks Animation crée un studio en Chine avec des groupes locaux

17.02.2012
Le studio DreamWorks Animation, à qui l'on doit notamment la série des "Shrek", "Kung Fu Panda" ou "Le Chat Potté", va créer un studio de production cinématographique en Chine, en partenariat avec des groupes locaux, a annoncé la société vendredi dans un communiqué.L'annonce intervient alors que le vice-président et probable futur numéro un chinois Xi Jinping est présent à Los Angeles pour un séjour à dominante économique, dernière étape de son voyage aux Etats-Unis.La nouvelle société, baptisée Oriental DreamWorks, se consacrera "au développement et à la production de films chinois originaux de grande qualité, d'animation ou en prises de vue réelles, à la fois pour le marché chinois et le reste du monde", précise le communiqué."Outre la création de contenus, la coentreprise exercera son activité dans les domaines du spectacle vivant, des parcs à thèmes, de la téléphonie mobile, de l'internet ou des jeux vidés", ajoute DreamWorks Animation.Oriental DreamWorks sera détenue à environ 55% par les sociétés publiques chinoises China Media Capital (CMC), Shanghai Media Group (SMG) et Shanghai Alliance Investment (SAI), les 45% restants revenant à DreamWorks Animation.Le nouveau studio bénéficiera d'un capital initial de 330 millions de dollars et devrait être opérationnel cette année, précise DreamWorks Animation."Nous sommes extrêmement fiers de la création d'Oriental DreamWorks avec CMC, SMG et SAI, une alliance révolutionnaire et historique pour créer une compagnie phare dans le divertissement familial", déclare dans le communiqué Jeffrey Katzenberg, patron de DreamWorks Animation."Nous comptons créer, avec nos partenaires chinois, une entreprise nouvelle en son genre, pour concevoir et produire localement des contenus de grande qualité et des expériences de divertissement familial, non seulement pour les Chinois mais aussi pour des marchés étrangers", ajoute-t-il.Les films de DreamWorks connaissent un grand succès en Chine, notamment la série des "Kung Fu Panda". Le premier volet en 2008 avait été le film d'animation le plus profitable de l'année en Chine, et le deuxième volet est devenu l'an dernier le film d'animation le plus profitable de toute l'histoire en Chine, avec des recettes de près de 100 millions de dollars.DreamWorks Animation n'est que le dernier en date d'une longue liste de studios hollywoodiens à vouloir tenter l'aventure chinoise, alléchés par un marché à la croissance exponentielle mais très verrouillé.Les "majors" Warner, Disney, Sony, Fox, ainsi que les "mini-majors" Relativity Media et Legendary Entertainment se sont déjà lancées dans la production de films pour le public chinois avec des partenaires locaux.Une façon aussi pour ces studios de contourner les stricts quotas chinois: seuls 20 films étrangers par an peuvent être distribués dans le pays. Plusieurs se sont néanmoins cassés les dents sur la sourcilleuse censure des autorités, et ont dû faire de nombreux compromis scénaristiques et artistiques.Avec ses films axés sur le public familial, et la puissance de ses partenaires, DreamWorks Animation devrait cependant éviter ces écueils.
AFP
Cet article a été publié dans la rubrique Flash actualité - Culture
source Le Parisien

Oriental DreamWorks, l’entreprise conjointe de DreamWorks Animation et de trois entreprises d’état chinoises (China Media Capital, Shanghai Media Group et Shanghai Alliance Investment), sera l’entreprise phare du media center en construction à Shanghai, sur la rive gauche de la Huangpu River. Avec un investissement initial de 330 M$, en cash et en propriété intellectuelle, les sociétés chinoises détiennent 55 % des parts, DreamWorks Animation 45 %. L’objectif est de fabriquer un long métrage d’animation par an à partir de 2016, et deux par an à partir de 2018. source date ?

DreamWorks CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg believes the new joint venture is a historic breakthrough, "I think it's a whole new period here. I think it's a new world in terms of what technology is available today. And China, as a land of opportunity for great animation, is unlimited. The sky is literally the limit here. I know the reception of our work in China has made me now very ambitious to figure out how to come to China, how to find the right Chinese partners to be a part of what I think can be a great industry and a great success story in China. So that's kind of my next big mission."
.../... Aside from Oriental DreamWorks, there are other things with "Hollywood DNA" in Shanghai. The first Disneyland theme park on the Chinese mainland is currently under construction in Shanghai's Pudong New Area with its first phase due to open for business in 2015.
.../... Currently Oriental DreamWorks has attracted the attention of a number of talented animators in China as well as at DreamWorks in the U.S. According to Katzenberg, DreamWorks will send designers, technicians and animators to China to train their Chinese counterparts and help China's animation production keep pace with what they are doing back in Hollywood.

Chinese cultural entrepreneur Li Yang sees a bright future in this, "It's widely acknowledged what DreamWorks has achieved. If their production team could adopt age-old Chinese culture to their creative process and produce great animations released around the world, it's a win-win scenario."
source 13 juillet 2012

DreamWorks Animation profit falls below Wall Street estimates
DreamWorks Animation, the Glendale studio behind the "Shrek" and "Madagascar" movies, reported lower-than-expected financial results for the second quarter.
source 31 juillet 2012 - par Richard Verrier
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China Box Office Up 37% in First Half of 2012
2012-08-08 09:32:42 Chinese Films
China's box office reached $1.19bn (RMB7.55bn) in the first six months of 2012, a 37% increase over the same period in 2011.

Hollywood blockbusters Titanic 3D, Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, The Avengers and Men In Black 3 were the major driving force behind box office growth.

The figures not only marked China's biggest half-year haul to date, they also represented the widest gap yet between foreign and local films. Foreign films took a 70% share of the box office with 38 releases, while 91 locally-produced films, including co-productions, accounted for 30%.

The gains made by Hollywood films follow China's decision in February to widen the film import quota with an additional 14 enhanced format films each year.

James Cameron's Titanic 3D is now the third highest-grossing film of all time in China, behind Camerson's Avatar ($215m) and Michael Bay's Transformers: Dark Of The Moon ($173m). Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, with $106.7m, becomes the fourth highest-grossing foreign film of all time in China.

The only Chinese films to rank in the top ten are Derek Yee's Hong Kong-China co-production The Great Magician and local animation Mission Incredible: Adventures On The Dragon's Trail, which ranked in ninth and tenth places with $27.32m and $25.9m respectively. Mission Incredible is part of the popular Pleasant Goat franchise.

Ning Hao's WWII action comedy Guns N' Roses stands as the third biggest local film in the first half of the year. Released in late April, while Titanic 3D, The Avengers and Battleship were on release, the film took in $24.06m (RMB153m) and is regarded by the local industry as one of the few survivors standing up to Hollywood competition.

March, which is generally regarded a quiet month at the Chinese box office, produced stronger results than usual thanks to releases such as John Carter, War Horse and Hong Kong-Chinese co-production A Simple Life, which scooped best actress at Venice last year. April, also usually a quiet month, was boosted by Titanic 3D, The Avengers and Battleship.

The first six months also saw a record number of releases – 129 compared to 103 in the first half of 2011.

According to stats from the past five years, first half box office usually accounts for 40% of the year-end total. Bigger Chinese films are usually released in the second half. Chinese films scheduled for the second half of this year include Feng Xiaogang's 1942, starring Adrien Brody and Tim Robbins, Wong Kar-wai's The Grandmaster and Jackie Chan's Chinese Zodiac.

However, Hollywood will also roll out The Dark Knight Rises, The Amazing Spider-man, Ice Age 4, The Hobbit and Life Of Pi from September to December. All of the above blockbusters will be released in 3D and possibly IMAX format, which means higher ticket prices and bigger numbers.

China Top Ten Box Office (Jan 1-June 30, 2012)

1.Titanic 3D – $153.46m (RMB976m)

2.Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol – $106.7m (RMB678.9m)

3.The Avengers – $90.41m (RMB575m)

4.Men In Black 3 – $88.05m (RMB560m)*

5.Journey 2: The Mysterious Island – $60.85m (RMB387.33m)

6.Battleship – $50m (RMB318m)

7.John Carter – $40.8m (RMB259.5m)

8.Sherlock Holms: A Game Of Shadows – $29.31m (RMB186.43m)

9.The Great Magician – $27.32m (RMB173.77m)

10.Mission Incredible: Adventures On The Dragon's Trail – $25.9m (RMB164.73m)

* Still on release, up until June 30, 2012

Source: SARFT and Screen International
source 8 août 2012
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Bona Film Group Limited
(Nasdaq:BONA), a leading film distributor and vertically integrated film company in China, today announced that the 19.9% equity stake in the Company originally purchased in May 2012 by News Corporation will now be held by 21st Century Fox following News Corp.'s separation of its businesses into two independent publicly-traded companies. 24 juillet 2013 article complet bonafilm.cn

Bona Film Group Limited ("Bona" or the "Company") (Nasdaq:BONA), a leading film distributor and vertically integrated film company in China, today announced that it has launched Wuhu Bona Jinyu Film Investment Center (the "Fund"), an RMB 1.0 billion (approximately US$163.4 million) fund that will finance the development and production of Bona's film and TV projects over the next two years.
The fund is established and managed by Wuhu Bona Film Investment Management Limited, a newly formed limited liability company whose shareholders include Bona, Sequoia Capital Investment Advisory (Tianjin) LLC ("Sequoia") and Gopher Asset Management Co., Ltd. ("Gopher"), a division of Noah Holdings Limited (NYSE:NOAH). Bona holds an equity stake in the Fund of approximately 30%, representing the commitment of investment rights in current and future projects, with approximately 70% of the Fund owned by outside investors. 29 août 2013 article complet bonafilm.cn


Fox International Channels
Multinational broadcaster Fox International Channels has launched a once every two week entertainment news show focusing on the Chinese-language film biz.
Presented by Hong Kong movie producer Helen To, the half-hour “SCM Cine” began airing this weekend on SCM, the FIC channel previously known as Star Chinese Movies. It will be rebroadcast further afield on other Fox channels in Singapore, Australia, the U.S. and Canada.
The company says the show is the latest leg of its “Go Local!” drive to dispense with a pan-regional approach and become more focused on individual market segments. - Patrick Frater 2 juillet 2013 article complet variety.com

Independent film companies are increasingly setting up shop in China, and using their ability to distribute Chinese films overseas to open doors in the territory. 7 novembre 2013

Fox International Productions and Ivanhoe Pictures
have closed a four year, multi-picture, co-financing deal for local language films in India, Korea, China, Japan and Taiwan.
Ivanhoe will invest in 10 FIP-produced films in varying stages of production in India, Korea, China and Taiwan. FIP currently is making films in 11 countries throughout Asia, Western Europe and Latin America. Ivanhoe’s initial allocation is $130 million.
“Last year, Asia as a whole represented 42% of the International box office and local language films globally account for $6.5 Billion, or around 30% of the total International box office,” said FIP President Sanford Panitch. “With the top four local product markets all being in Asia (India, China, Japan, and Korea), it continues to be a priority for Fox International Productions as we expand our activities in the region with this new deal. Robert Friedland is an impressively forward-thinking and global-minded businessman and we look forward to working with him and his team.” - 12 novembre 2013 article complet variety.com

Bona Film Group Limited
("Bona" or the "Company") (Nasdaq:BONA), a leading film distributor and vertically integrated film company in China, today announced that Bona Film Group Co., Ltd. (PRC) has entered into a master credit line agreement with Shanghai Pudong Development Bank Co., Ltd., a premier nationwide commercial bank in China. Pursuant to this agreement, Shanghai Pudong Development Bank has agreed to provide a revolving credit line in the amount of RMB80 million (approximately US$13.0 million) for a term of three years. The credit line will be used to fund the continued expansion of the Company's movie theater business. 2 décembre 2013 article complet bonafilm.cn

Yu Dong, chief executive of Chinese film studio and distributor Bona, plans to make 45 films over the next three years. latimes.com - Julie Makinen 29 novembre 2013

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Box Office chinafilmbiz.com
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Merci pour l´info Folet, je ne savais pas que l´on pouvait avoir accès à ses données smile.gif Je vais me renseigner pour the White Strom et Control, j´ai bien envie de découvrir ses films!
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Entering 2013, there were grave concerns about the domestic film industry. For the first time in a decade, foreign films out-earned domestic movies, the 'water army' scandal of fake web postings to alter a movie’s rating was an embarrassment and the Chongqing Economic Times reported that 80 percent of mainland films recorded a deficit. 365 days later and how things have changed. China's box office topped RMB20 billion for the first time ever, with domestic films making up 58 percent of that revenue. The country is now officially the second biggest film market in the world and Shenzhen’s TCL even purchased the naming rights to famed Mann's Chinese Theater on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

With event films like Police Story 2013, Firestorm and The Monkey King either just hitting movie screens or coming soon, 2014 looks like it will be even bigger. It's a trend that Beijing-based entertainment industry research institute EntGroup has been tracking for years

article complet thatsmags.com


China's online streaming services have become an increasingly important battleground as the country subtly introduces efforts to combat piracy. Last summer, Beijing police arrested eleven suspects in an unprecedented take-down of piracy website silu.com, which offered unlicensed downloads of 18,772 films to its over 400,000 registered members.

In November, Baidu was sued for RMB300 million for copyright violation in a joint lawsuit by Youku, Tudou, Tencent, Sohu.com, Dalian Wanda and the Motional Picture Association of America (MPAA). Later that month, the government announced plans to establish a court devoted to intellectual property rights protection as part of their 60-point roadmap.

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Celestial Tiger Entertainment Signs Exclusive Output Deals with Mega-Vision Project Workshop Limited and Universe Entertainment Limited
CELESTIAL MOVIES now has output deals with all five of the major Chinese film studios and distributors
article complet casbaa.com
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{...}
“Chinese buyers are now talking more about the quality of the project than the number of distribution slots,” said Gary Hamilton, CEO of production-sales group Arclight Films. “It is really important to them that this is a global project, rather than something niche. The first three questions they ask are: ‘Who is in it?’ ‘Who is distributing in the States’ and ‘What’s the budget?’”

David U. Lee of independent Chinese distributor Leeding Media says that the boost to the market that some sellers anticipated from last year’s change to the import quotas — from 20 to 34 — has now peaked.

“The last market was overhyped. Prices are now flat or up only slightly, the big acceleration may be over,” said Lee. “Actually the increase in quotas has made our (independently sourced) films less competitive. That’s because we now have 14 more studio-level pictures per year coming into the country against us.”

A slowdown or reality check may be a welcome.gif change as the Chinese distribution scene is still very far from being a free market — there’s the quota restrictions on the number of revenue-sharing films that can be imported, censorship that is liberalizing only slowly and direct government intervention in the releasing calendar designed to favor local films.

Still, the Chinese theatrical market has become simply too big to ignore. By the end of September, box office had equalled last year’s 12-month total of $2.7 billion, putting it on course for a full year total worth $3.2 billion.

“In one significant way things are changing. Many of the Chinese firms here at AFM seem as interested in co-production as they do in outright acquisition,” said Ying Ye, Hamilton’s partner in Arclight’s specialty Asian label, Easternlight. “We have licensed our John Cusack movie ‘Reclaim’ but we will do ‘Priority Run’ as a co-production. It is in pre-production with Donnie Yen set and a U.S. actor yet to be cast.”

The Chinese partner is likely to have a say in who gets cast. Arclight/Easternlight already have Nicolas Cage actioner “Outcast” and thriller “The Nest 3D,” which is in development, structured as Chinese co-ventures.

Still other insiders point out that filmmaking and buying is only part of the reason the Chinese are in L.A. “It’s the money business, not the movie business,” says one. “Many Chinese still have strong reasons to want to get money offshore and out of China.”

Michael J. Werner, chairman of Fortissimo Films, said, “What are the Chinese buying? Properties in Beverly Hills.”

After the show-stopping announcements by Chinese property and film group Wanda — last year it paid $2.3 billion for North American theater chain AMC, and in September this year called up a dozen Hollywood A-listers to celebrate its new studio facility-cum-yacht brokerage — China has become a more frequent port of call for U.S. movie companies.
{...}

article complet variety.com 10 novembre 2013
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Anniversary Marks Maturing CEPA
12/11/2013 - 09:13
The structure of Hong Kong’s film industry has changed over the past ten years since introduction of the Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement (CEPA), an agreement signed between Hong Kong and mainland China, in which Hong Kong-mainland co-productions are granted the same treatment as mainland films.
According to CEPA, Hong Kong films can raise funds from the mainland, and Hong Kong capital can hold majority investment in mainland cinemas. Many Hong Kong film makers including master directors Tsui Hark and Ann Hui and backbone directors Peter Chan, Benny Chan and Derek Yee have developed movies on the mainland since 2003.
Noting the ten year anniversary, press commentators wrote that, during the past 10 years, these explorers have experienced censorship, uncomfortable adaptations and poor box office performance. But, in recent years, some Hong Kong directors have found ways to combine their talents with mainland capital and market to co-produce successfully with mainland colleagues.


Film Buyouts in China: A Gamble
01/15/2014 - 07:56
China imported a total of 75 foreign films in 2012, including 14 special income sharers (IMAX and 3D), 20 common income sharers and 41 buyouts. In 2013, imported films fell to 57, including 32 income sharers and 25 buyouts.
Only China Film Group (CFG) and Huaxia Film can import and distribute foreign films in China. In recent years some private companies also started to enter the business of buyouts. But they have to get a quota release from China Film, which usually relies on relationships. This brings risk to buyers, and they become more cautious because copyright prices rise sharply and profits drop. {...}


GAPPRFT Signals End to Format Bonanza
10/24/2013 - 07:06
The General Administration of Press & Publication, Radio, Film and TV (GAPPRFT) has recently issued new rules for Satellite TV broadcasters in 2014 that could end the lucrative sales of foreign entertainment TV formats to China.
The GAPPRFT rules restrict each satellite channel to importing just one format each year which cannot be broadcast during primetime (19:30 to 22:30). The only exception will be one music talent show to be selected by GAPPRFT from all submissions made by satellite TV channels.
Domestic shows will have priority in terms of broadcast approval in primetime and receiving awards from GAPPRFT. Further restrictions include satellite TV channels not broadcasting more than three galas on holidays and festivals. The rules mean that over ten current New Year TV specials will not be allowed.
The rules also state that 30% of total weekly broadcast time on satellite TV channels must be given over to content including news, animation and documentaries on economics, culture, education, life services and agriculture.


Chinese TV Series are Mostly Sequels
11/13/2013 - 06:22
More than 60% of all TV dramas to be launched next year will be sequels, according to the organizers of the 2013 China TV Drama Fair in Hangzhou.
China’s TV screens have been full of Anti-Japanese war dramas over the past two years, leading to audience fatigue. Next year TV dramas featuring love and marriage will be the new choice for Chinese production companies.
Industry insiders point out that China’s TV drama workers run too fast to make money without time and energy to produce high quality dramas. Production, marketing and evaluation system all need reforms.


A Big Growth in China’s National Holiday Box Office
11/07/2013 - 07:49
The slow growth in film box offices during China’s National Holiday seen for three
years has been reversed this year with total box office during the seven days from
October 1 to 7 increasing 100% over 2010, while accumulated filmgoers increased
145% compared to the same year.
Total box office this year to October 10 has reached RMB17.05 billion (US$2.79
billion), surpassing the total from 2012. Comedies and 3D films were especially
favored during the holidays according to press analysis.


2013 Full Year Theater Stats
01/15/2014 - 08:20
903 new cinemas opened in 2013 across mainland China with total number reaching 4,583. 5,077 new screens were installed to reach 18,195. 480,000 new seats were added during the year. Film goers totaled 610 million, increasing 32% over 2012.
Year-on-year growth in film goers was 34% and 45% in 2012 and 2011 respectively. tableau


China Film Fund Makes a Billion
01/15/2014 - 07:53
With the growth in China’s box office revenues, China’s Film Special Fund collection increased by 41.9% from RMB320 million (US$52.87 million) in 2012 to RMB1.09 billion (US$180 million) in 2013.
It has collected around RMB4 billion (US$660 million) since its founding in 1991. 5% of every ticket sold goes to the Fund to support the development of the Chinese film industry.
{..}
Before the Fund was established, the film industry was losing money due to the popularity of TV as well as inflation. China’s economy was in difficulty at that time and could not spare money to support film.
In August 2011, famous Chinese director Feng Xiaogang proposed to cancel the 5% Film Fund collected from companies, arguing the government should pay the subsidies. Voices of support appeared at that time.

01/15/2014 - 07:49
The State Administration of Press & Publication, Radio, Film and TV (SAPPRFT) has punished Xinjiang Bingtuan Satellite TV and Sichuan Satellite TV with bans on commercial advertisement broadcasts for 15 and 7 days respectively from January 9 due to their violation of TV shopping regulations.
SAPPRFT regulated in an October 29 2013 notice that TV channels should not broadcast any TV shopping ads from 18:00 to 24:00. Each TV shopping ad during 0:00-18:00 should not exceed 3 minutes, and should not be broadcast more than once in the same hour or three times on the same day. The notice was supposed to be carried out from January 1 2014.

01/15/2014 - 07:46
..., SAPPRFT announced in a notice on Dec 31, 2013 that all radio and TV programs should use standard pronunciation, immediately robbing variety show hosts of the deepest well of cheap laughs in their play book.
{...}... all anchors and hosts should speak Putonghua unless there are special reasons, and should not speak unnecessary foreign languages in Mandarin
{...} Since TV shows usually carry subtitles, many netizens argue that funny accents do not hinder general audience understanding. More sophisticated observers note that dialects are precious examples of intangible cultural heritage, and that SAPPRFT is in breach of United Nations regulations.
In a website survey on the notice, 66.6% of netizens expressed “No support”.

01/15/2014 - 07:42
American variety show Saturday Night Live, with a history of nearly 40 years, was imported and broadcast by Sohu Video recently. But Chinese audiences seem to find it hard to get the jokes. Possibly due to cultural differences?
{...} Sohu Video says it will add some background knowledge in future translations.

iResearch: Online Video Revenues Break US$2b
01/15/2014 - 07:37
Online video market revenue in 2013 hit RMB12.8 billion (US$ 2.12 billion), a 41.9% year-on-year increase.

Comedians Not Laughing Now
01/08/2014 - 11:39
Chinese satellite TV channels are now cancelling half of their comedy variety shows planned for 2014. In October 2013 they announced more than 20 shows slated to be launched next year, but half have been delayed or called off so far. {...}

The Age of China's Cinema Audience
01/08/2014 - 11:28
The majority of China’s cinema audiences are between 25 to 35 years old, accounting for 68% of the total, according to research by EntGroup. {...}

Online Takes 17% of Box Office Ticketing
12/19/2013 - 04:33
In April this year, total online cinema ticket sales reached RMB300 million (US$49.41 million), 17% of mainland box office for the month. According to press reports, two types of e-commercial platform are winning this business. {...}


Film Stars Flock to Flat Screen
12/19/2013 - 04:26
In the wider context of the national crackdown on over-entertainment and the ban on extravagant public events, this week Chinese media commentators have been asking why mainland film actors and actresses are following their US counterparts in flocking to appear in TV dramas that they previously would not have touched.
Could it be that films are too slow and eclectic in their audience appeal? It does take much longer to shoot, post produce and distribute a film; and TV dramas do have a wider range of audiences. Quicker and wider exposure benefits stars and they can have more choice of scripts.
So the argument goes but, in reality, stars have always appeared in dodgy films for money and appearing in low-brow TV dramas now is no different. The bottom line is that TV dramas are now paying the same or higher salaries to artists as films. With the market for personal appearances remaining weak, what else is a star to do?

GAPPRFT Gift to 3D and Giant Screen Film Makers
12/19/2013 - 04:23
Building on its original decision to give subsidies to production companies and cinema chain operators to encourage production of films with high technologies, GAPPRFT has released an additional measure to increase subsidies according to box office takings. The new policy is expected to lead to an increase in domestic 3D and giant screen films next year. tableau

Disney-Bes TV Joint Venture
12/11/2013 - 09:24
The Walt Disney Company and Bes TV will set up a joint venture in China, to explore mainland China digital content markets and manage the two companies’ project services, products and content.

@cmmintelligence.com
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La Commission du film de Taipei et la Commission du film d’Ile-de-France ont signé en 2010 un accord visant à conforter la coopération entre les deux pays dans le domaine de la production et de la post-production. Plusieurs rendez-vous ont ainsi été organisés dans la capitale taiwanaise par la Commission du film de Taipei, afin de permettre aux sociétés franciliennes d’effets visuels de rencontrer les réalisateurs et les producteurs taiwanais, indique la Commission du film d’Ile-de-France dans un communiqué. Celle-ci souligne aussi le « soutien précieux » apporté par le Bureau français de Taipei. @taiwaninfo.nat.gov.tw (site du ministère des Affaires étrangères)




Box office année 2013 ($ m)
Journey to the West: Conquering the Demons ...205.8
……………Iron Man 3 ...116.5
So Young ...115.8
……………Pacific Rim ...114
Young Detective Dee: Rise of the Sea ...99.1
Personal Tailor ...96.1
American Dreams in China ...87.6
Finding Mr. Right ...84.3
Tiny Times ...79.3
……………Gravity ...72.7
……………Fast and Furious 6 ...67.7
……………The Croods ...65.2
……………Man of Steel ...65.17
……………Skyfall ...61.1
……………Star Trek Into Darkness ...57.8
……………Jurassic Park (3D) ...57.5
……………Thor: The Dark World ...56.8
Police Story 2013 ...56.2
……………G.I. Joe: Retaliation ...54.5
……………The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey ...51.2

Pendant que j'y suis :

Box Office distributeurs
Wanda International Cinemas …………… RMB 2.36 billion (US$ 387.37 million)
Shanghai United Circuit……………RMB 1.42 billion (US$ 233.71 million)
China Film Stellar Theater Chain……………RMB 1.39 billion (US$ 227.95 million)
Guangdong Dadi Film Line……………RMB 1.21 billion (US$ 199.23 million)
China Film South Cinema Circuit……………RMB 1.18 billion (US$ 193.72 million)
Jinyi Zhujiang Movie Circuit……………RMB 1.15 billion (US$ 189.27 million)
Zhejiang Times Cinema Line……………RMB 709.34 million (US$ 116.62 million)
Beijing New Film Association……………RMB 658.13 million (US$ 107.54 million)
Zhejiang Hengdian Cinema Circuit……………RMB 591.96 million (US$ 97.32 million)
CFG Digital Cinema Chain……………RMB 556.75 million (US$ 91.53 million)
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Suite aux mauvais résultats et aux plaintes qu'elle a reçues, la TVB change sa politique de production et évitera de prendre les mêmes artistes pour les séries de manière récurrentes. Son catalogue devrait être plus diversifié.
Fin 2013, Peter Au, Directeur général adjoint, a annoncé les plans 2014. Il a notamment révélé que des acteurs majeurs participeront à des spectacles et séries. Comme par exemple :
Anthony Wong jouera dans une série intitulée Kung Fu et participera à une émission de cuisine : Anthony's Canteen.
Tony Leung Ka Fai fera partie du casting de Seize The Moment dont la production doit commencer en avril.
Sammo Hung doit également apparaître dans une émission de cuisine.
Des remaniements également au niveau de l'écriture des scripts qui s'éternise et de leurs changements de dernières minutes qui affectent le travail de chacun. A présent, les scénarios devront être au moins à 80 % terminés pour qu'une production débute.
La TVB tiendra plus compte des goûts de ses spectateurs dont certains se sont plaints que la production faisait plutôt selon les siens propres.
La TVB a prévu des remakes d'anciennes séries qui seront rafraîchies, espérant recréer dès cette année leur âge d'or.


Note personnelle : En ce qui concerne la diversité de distribution, il ne faut pas s'attendre à des changements. Les castings des séries 2014 listées présentes toujours les mêmes noms d'une série à l'autre.
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Merci pour les textes très intéressants !
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